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PILATUS PC-9 Beech

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PC9
Aircraft
Name PC-9 Beech
Manufacturer PILATUS
Body Narrow
Wing Fixed Wing
Position Low wing
Tail Regular tail, low set
WTC Light
APC A
Type code L1T
Engine Turboprop
Engine count Single
Position Nose mounted
Landing gear Tricycle retractable
Mass group 2


Manufacturered as:

HAWKER DE HAVILLAND PC-9
PILATUS Hudournik
PILATUS PC-9
PILATUS PC-9 Hudournik


PILATUS PC-9 Beech

PILATUS PC-9 Beech PILATUS PC-9 Beech 3D

Description

Advanced trainer. In service since 1985 (T-6A since 2000). More powerful development of PILATUS PC-7 turbo trainer with new cockpit and tail. Major operators in Europe, Asia and Africa. In Germany operating 10 PC-8Bs as target towings. Further development by RAYTHEON, United States, T-6A Texan II for US Air Force and US Navy (700 aircraft). Export customers of T-6A are Canada (24 aircraft designated CT-156 Harvard II) and Greece (45 aircraft).

Technical Data

Wing span 10.1 m33.136 ft
Length 10.2 m33.465 ft
Height 3.3 m10.827 ft
Powerplant PC-9: 1 x 1.150 SHP P&W PT6A-62 turbo-prop with 4 blade propeller.

T-6A: 1 x 1.708 SHP P&W PT6A-68 turbo-prop with 4 blade propeller.

Engine model

Performance Data

Take-Off Initial Climb
(to 5000 ft)
Initial Climb
(to FL150)
Initial Climb
(to FL240)
MACH Climb Cruise Initial Descent
(to FL240)
Descent
(to FL100)
Descent (FL100
& below)
Approach
V2 (IAS) kts IAS kts IAS kts IAS kts MACH TAS 300 kts MACH IAS kts IAS kts Vapp (IAS) kts
Distance 227 m ROC 4000 ft/min ROC ft/min ROC ft/min ROC ft/min MACH ROD ft/min ROD ft/min MCS kts Distance 417 m
MTOW 32003,200 kg
3.2 tonnes
kg
Ceiling FL380 ROD ft/min APC A
WTC L Range 887887 nm
1,642,724 m
1,642.724 km
5,389,514.44 ft
NM

Accidents & Serious Incidents involving PC9

  • PC9, Manoeuvring, Warbelow Germany, 2012 (On 27 September 2012, a civil-operated Pilatus PC9 facilitating military target training for ground forces sustained structural damage to one wing when it struck an Osprey whilst at high speed and low level. The aircraft immediately became uncontrollable and the pilots did not have time to activate their ejector seats before the aircraft crashed and was destroyed. The Investigation noted that there were no relevant bird strike tolerance requirements for civil aircraft and attributed the accident systemically to use of such aircraft for target training and their operation at high speeds in airspace with a high bird strike risk.)