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Difference between revisions of "Transient Luminous Events (TLEs)"

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==Description==
 
==Description==
  
[[File:TLEs.jpg|none|thumb|400px|Transient Luminous Events schematic produced by NOAA (source: Wikicommons)]]
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[[File:TLEs.jpg|400px|Transient Luminous Events schematic produced by NOAA (source: Wikicommons)]]
  
 
==Sprites==
 
==Sprites==

Revision as of 14:04, 24 July 2019

Article Information
Category: Weather Weather
Content source: SKYbrary About SKYbrary
Content control: SKYbrary About SKYbrary
WX
Tag(s) Weather Phenomena

Description

Transient Luminous Events schematic produced by NOAA (source: Wikicommons)

Sprites

reach 50 – 90 km in altitude and are triggered by positive CG lightning. Sprite is also an acronym for Stratospheric/mesospheric Preturbations Resulting from Intense Thunderstorm Electrification. They are reddish-orange in color. Unlike tropospheric lightning, sprites are cold plasma, similar to fluorescent tube discharge. Based on their shape and visual appearance, we distinguish three types of sprites: jellyfish, column and carrot sprites.

Blue Jets

project directly from the top of the thunderstorm in a narrow cone jet up to approximately 50 km altitude. Unlike sprites, blue jets are, as the name implies, blue in color. They are not connected to lightning strikes. A smaller variation of blue jets are blue starters, which are similar to blue jets, but only reach about 20 km high up and are thought to be ‘failed’ blue jets.


Gigantic Jets

are similar to blue jets, but reach 70 km high and are exceedingly rare. The upper parts of gigantic jets produce red emissions, similar to sprites. Only a handful have been photographed or captured on video.

Elves

sprite halos and elves are rare and indistinct types of TLEs, producing large diffuse glows, in case of elves up to 400 km in diameter.


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